Rare Victorian - Hunzinger Parlor Suite Hits $17,925 at Neal’s Winter Estate Event
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Hunzinger Parlor Suite Hits $17,925 at Neal’s Winter Estate Event

Hunzinger Parlor Suite e1266094238660 Hunzinger Parlor Suite Hits $17,925 at Neal’s Winter Estate Event

As evidenced by the Hunzinger Parlor Suite sale, the results of Neal Auction Company’s Winter Estate Auction held January 30 and 31 are impressive indeed. Fine Victorian suites and cabinets were sale highlights.

Bearing the stamp of George Hunzinger, New York was this fabulous late 19th century American Renaissance carved and ebonized walnut parlor suite that reached $17,925. Prices include 22 percent buyer’s premium. The Hunzinger parlor suite consisted of a pair of armchairs and a sofa with each having anthemion crests, scroll, blocked and reeded stiles, pendant fruit clusters and rectangular backs. The button-tufted arms terminated in bosses and each sported pierced demilune aprons and canted front legs with hoof feet.

Another Victorian-era parlor suite of drastically different style than the Hunzinger parlor suite was this mid-19th century American Rococo carved and laminated rosewood grouping consisting of a sofa, four side chairs and an armchair made $13,145. Attributed to John Henry Belter, New York, the suite was done in the pattern known as “Rosalie with Grapes.” The sofa had a fruit and nut-carved triple crest, serpentine arms, a rose and leaf serpentine seat rail, acanthus and rose cabriole legs, while the armchair and side chairs were of a conforming pattern. The suite had descended in the family of John Brand (1785-1849) who was the owner of Rose Hill, Lexington, KY.

Rosalie Grapes Sofa Hunzinger Parlor Suite Hits $17,925 at Neal’s Winter Estate Event

Another piece of mid-19th century furniture done in the “Rosalie with Grapes” pattern, this being an American Rococo meridienne sold for $7,170. Again attributed to John Henry Belter, New York, this meridienne with a low scrolled back and single serpentine arm measured 38 in high, 43 in wide and 26 in deep. This piece also once belonged to John Brand, owner of Rose Hill in Kentucky.

Selling strong at $17,327.50 was a wonderful Renaissance Revival carved, ebonized and burl walnut parlor cabinet attributed to Allen & Brother, Philadelphia. The circa 1870 piece had a gadrooned pediment, a centered door carved in high-relief with the bust of a maiden, and lion head brackets. The lower case had a blocked front with female terms and a frieze drawer. The cabinet door was enhanced with foliate-carved and beribboned reserve that contained a lyre-incised panel. Two acroteria wells flanked the plinth which had egg and dart molding. Measuring 65 ½ in high, 60 in wide and 25 in deep, this cabinet was impressive.

Coming in at $14,340 was another circa 1870 cabinet made in Philadelphia. This example, an American Renaissance inlaid, bronze-mounted rosewood cabinet was ebonized and gilded. Having a crest centered by a roundel with a Classical bust, the cabinet featured an arch pediment with anthemia. Adding to its appeal was the blocked central cabinet having a bronze bust of a female goddess and a door panel inlaid with a bird and ewer design. This door was then flanked by columns. The side cabinets had arch pediments and wore centered bronze plaques. These cabinets also had canted corners and doors inlaid with musical trophies. Sitting on plinth shaped feet, and wearing a pleasant old surface, this cabinet measured 67 ¾ in high, 65 ½ in wide and 20 in deep.

The inlay work featured on the top of this American Renaissance ebonized and gilt-incised walnut table was first-rate. Called a “Centennial” center table, this circa 1876 piece attributed to Kilian Brothers, New York featured a most impressive top. Inlaid with a bust of George Washington, the design was further enhanced with eagles and two American flags which were flanked with roundels of “1776” and “1876.” Having a conforming apron and standing on trumpet legs with an incurvate stretcher centered with a finial, this lovely table sold for $4,880. It measured 28 in high by 28 in wide and 19 in deep.

By Susan Mellish

Hunzinger Parlor Suite Sells at Neal’s Winter Estate Event

By

Susan Mellish

330.424.1128 * suemellish@gmail.com

The results of Neal Auction Company’s Winter Estate Auction held January 30 and 31 are impressive indeed. Fine Victorian suites and cabinets were sale highlights.

Bearing the stamp of George Hunzinger, New York was this fabulous late 19th century American Renaissance carved and ebonized walnut parlor suite that reached $17,925. Prices include 22 percent buyer’s premium. The suite consisted of a pair of armchairs and a sofa with each having anthemion crests, scroll, blocked and reeded stiles, pendant fruit clusters and rectangular backs. The button-tufted arms terminated in bosses and each sported pierced demilune aprons and canted front legs with hoof feet. The sofa was an impressive 64in long.

Another parlor suite, this being a mid-19th century American Rococo carved and laminated rosewood grouping consisting of a sofa, four side chairs and an armchair made $13,145. Attributed to John Henry Belter, New York, the suite was done in the pattern known as “Rosalie with Grapes.” The sofa had a fruit and nut-carved triple crest, serpentine arms, a rose and leaf serpentine seat rail, acanthus and rose cabriole legs, while the armchair and side chairs were of a conforming pattern. The suite had descended in the family of John Brand (1785-1849) who was the owner of Rose Hill, Lexington, KY.

Another piece of mid-19th century furniture done in the “Rosalie with Grapes” pattern, this being an American Rococo meridienne sold for $7,170. Again attributed to John Henry Belter, New York, this meridienne with a low scrolled back and single serpentine arm measured 38in high, 43in wide and 26in deep. This piece also once belonged to John Brand, owner of Rose Hill in Kentucy.

Selling strong at $17,327.50 was a wonderful Renaissance Revival carved, ebonized and burl walnut parlor cabinet attributed to Allen & Brother, Philadelphia. The circ 1870 piece had a gadrooned pediment, a centered door carved in high-relief with the bust of a maiden, and lion head brackets. The lower case had a blocked front with female terms and a frieze drawer. The cabinet door was enhanced with foliate-carved and beribboned reserve that contained a lyre-incised panel. Two acroteria wells flanked the plinth which had egg and dart molding. Measuring 65 ½in high, 60in wide and 25in deep, this cabinet was impressive.

Coming in at $14,340 was another circa 1870 cabinet made in Philadelphia. This example, an American Renaissance inlaid, bronze-mounted rosewood cabinet was ebonized and gilded. Having a crest centered by a roundel with a Classical bust, the cabinet featured an arch pediment with anthemia. Adding to its appeal was the blocked central cabinet having a bronze bust of a female goddess and a door panel inlaid with a bird and ewer design. This door was then flanked by columns. The side cabinets had arch pediments and wore centered bronze plaques. These cabinets also had canted corners and doors inlaid with musical trophees. Sitting on plinth shaped feet, and wearing a pleasant old surface, this cabinet measured 67 ¾in high, 65 ½in wide and 20in deep.

The inlay work featured on the top of this American Renaissance ebonized and gilt-incised walnut table was first-rate. Called a “Centennial” center table, this circa 1876 piece attributed to Kilian Brothers, New York featured a most impressive top. Inlaid with a bust of George Washington, the design was further enhanced with eagles and two American flags which were flanked with roundels of “1776” and “1876.” Having a conforming apron and standing on trumpet legs with an incurvate stretcher centered with a finial, this lovely table sold for $4,880. It measured 28in high by 28in wide and 19in deep.

Lots used include 45, 47, 124, 318, 393

Images can be found here http://www.nealauction.com/indexnet.html

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